The Help, Kathryn Stockett

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6 Responses to “The Help, Kathryn Stockett”

  1. Morgan D. Says:

    The Help is an amazing book about black maids in Jackson, Mississippi. Skeeter is a writer that writes about the life stories of black maids in Jackson. She goes around begging all of the maids to tell their life stories to uncover the whites. But, they don’t go for it. They are all too scared of getting caught. That is until Abiline comes to Skeeter in private and tells her story. After that one black maid came to Skeeter, many others came too. Skeeter was so happy about these results that she eventually published the book, which affected many whites and other blacks.

    Evaluation: This book was absolutely amazing. I was really moved by Skeeter’s love for black people even in her time! This book was a page turner, and it kept me wanting to read!

    Rating: 4/5 stars

    Recommendations: The Hunger Games, Catching Fire, Speak.

  2. Aud M. Says:

    Summary: The Help is a book about black maids in the 1960s. There are three main characters, each different in personalities. Minnie has an attitude, but after being convinced to help Skeeter with her book. Skeeter is in her 20s; she was writing a novel about all the maids in Jackson, Mississippi. She has a difficult time getting enough maids to interview. Aibileen is also a black maid, who has raised over 17 children, only one being her own, who died very young. Aibileen is fed up by the horrible ways she is being treated, and she is the first to let Skeeter interview her so she can write her book.

    Evaluation: This book is great. I watched the movie and I thought the book was a lot better.

    Rating: 5/5

    Recommendations: The Absolutely True Diary of a Part Time Indian, Decoded, and The Hunger Games

  3. Tess P. Says:

    Summary:
    The Help is a novel written by Kathryn Stockett focusing on the hardships faced by black maids in Jackson, Mississippi, 1962. The book is narrated by three women: Aibileen, Skeeter, and Minny. Aibileen is a fifty-something year old black woman, working for a white family. Skeeter is 22 years old, and a recent graduate from Ole Miss who has returned home hoping for a chance to live out her dream job as a writer. Minny is also a black maid who cannot resist speaking her mind, which has lost her many jobs and gained her a wicked reputation. All three of these different women are brought together as Skeeter strives to document the untold side of black maids in the south. By digging deeper into Aibileen and Minny, Skeeter finds more than she could have ever imagined.

    Evaluation:
    I am very excited to say that The Help has been the best book I’ve read in a very long time. The southern accents and words brought the characters to life in my mind, which I loved. Each page dug deeper in the complicated lives of people that seemed completely real. It was like I had walked right into Mississippi, and I couldn’t get out. I was hooked on the first page, and I would highly recommend this book to all.

    Rating: 5 Stars

    Recommendations:
    Looking for Alaska, by John Green
    The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green
    The Book Thief, by Markus Zusak

  4. Kate Y. Says:

    Summary: The Help is a book that takes place in Mississippi during the 1960s. A young woman, Skeeter, who is a hopeful writer, is writing a book about the real stories of the black house maids who work in the homes of the white people in Jackson. The first maid to come forward is named Abilene, who has raised 17 children in her days as a maid. Once Aibileen tells her story, the other maids begin to tell theirs too, leaving Skeeter with a much bigger story than she was expecting.

    Evaluation: This was a really good book. I like how it was written so that it makes you feel like you are in their time period. The characters were realistic and relatable. I recommend this book to everyone, because it never gets slow or boring.

    Rating: 5/5 stars

    Recommendations: The Hunger Games series, Water for Elephants, Pretty Little Liars.

  5. Summer Z. Says:

    Summary: The Help is a truly inspiring book about black maids in the 1960s. There are three main characters, each different in personalities. Minnie is a grumpy black maid with an attitude, yet she agrees to help Skeeter by giving her stories to put in her book. Skeeter is in her 20s, an aspiring writer, writing a novel about all the maids in Jackson, Mississippi. She has a difficult time getting enough maids to interview, while she has love on her mind and a dying mother she feels so compelled to please. Aibileen is also a black maid, who has raised over 17 children, only one being her own, who died very young. Aibileen is fed up by the horrible ways she is being treated, and is first to let Skeeter interview her so she can write her book.

    Evaluation: This book is absolutley outstanding. I have never read a better book in my whole life. It never ever gets boring, and I strongly reccomend everyone to read it. It literally feels like you are being sucked into the story, and you are living life with these three outstanding ladies.

    Rating: 5/5 stars

    Recommendations: Water for Elephants by Sara Gruen, all three Hunger Games books by Suzanne Collins

  6. Sarah H. Says:

    Summary: Jackson, Mississippi in the 1960’s was a very interesting place. In this fictional book about black maids in white households, Miss Skeeter is an aspiring writer and, with her growing curiosity about her previous maid who disappeared, decides to write a book from the point of view of the help. Finding it more difficult than expected to get 12 black maids to help her, she starts with one. Piece by piece, the book comes together and stories are told, but not before more bad things begin to happen in Jackson.

    Evaluation: This is one of the best books I’ve ever read. The characters are very real and the writing is so flawless it’s like the pages turn themselves.

    Rating: 5/5

    Recommendations:
    Tuesdays with Morrie, Looking for Alaska, the Return Journey

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